Courses & Descriptions

The course descriptions below provides a brief outline about the course. Please refer to the syllabus of each program for the mandatory courses to be taken under it.

Note: For quick search, press Ctrl+F then type the course code (ex. MCH 523)

Biblical Language Courses

Introductory courses in the original language of the New Testament, Koine Greek, designed to give students a basic understanding of the elements of Greek orthography, phonology, morphology and syntax. The two-trimester sequence will emphasize fundamentals of Greek grammar and vocabulary development.

Credits: 6

Serves to advance the intermediate Greek student’s knowledge in the areas of Greek grammar, syntax and vocabulary. The student will also be introduced to advanced methods of biblical exegesis and readings in the Greek New Testament, the Septuagint and other materials, and encouraged to develop a basic understanding of textual criticism. (Prerequisites: BGR 508 and BGR 509)

Credits: 3

Designed for the purpose of helping advanced Greek students focus more in detail on the orthography, phonology, morphology and syntax in the Greek New Testament, the Septuagint and some Early Church Fathers. (Prerequisites: Greek I, II, III, and a Greek Exegesis Class)

Credits: 3

Introductory courses in the language of the Old Testament, classical or biblical Hebrew, designed to introduce students to the elements of Hebrew orthography, phonology, morphology, and syntax. The two-trimester sequence will emphasize fundamentals of Hebrew grammar and vocabulary development.

Credits: 6

Offers reading of the Hebrew text in selected passages and some interaction with various additional sources of Hebrew language (e.g. Modern Hebrew). It is designed to give students added experience in handling the Hebrew language and increasing their vocabulary. Students are also encouraged to develop a basic understanding of textual criticism. (Prerequisites: BHE 508 and BHE 509.)

Credits: 3

Biblical Theology Courses

Traces the development of the concept of the Spirit of God throughout the Old Testament. It also includes the investigation of the ancient Near Eastern material pertinent to the OT concept of the Spirit of God.

Credits: 3

A study of various traditions and emphases of the Holy Spirit by New Testament authors. While allowing various books to speak for themselves, a comprehensive picture of New Testament pneumatology is developed.

Credits: 3

A study of the biblical and theological foundations for missions. Attention is given to the theme of the kingdom of God as it relates to the missionary task.

Credits: 3

A survey of the prophetic movement of ancient Israel in the context of its social, political, cultural and religious environment. Its origin, development, tradition, role and significance to the society and its religion will be investigated.

Credits: 3

A study of the central biblical-theological themes in the Old Testament. This study includes reflections on the history and methodologies of Old Testament Theology along with specific theological trajectories.

Credits: 3

The major theological and doctrinal themes of the New Testament are examined in light of their immediate historical and cultural contexts. A survey of the history, methodology, and presuppositions of the discipline is included.

Credits: 3

A study of selected psalms on the basis of their theological content. It gives consideration to the structure of Hebrew poetry and interpretation of each psalm in its context in the Psalter.

Credits: 3

A study in the major theological themes in Luke/Acts. Special attention is given to Luke’s overall purpose, his Pentecostal perspective, and his unique contribution to New Testament theology.

Credits: 3

A study of the distinct contributions of Paul’s missionary, pastoral, and theological thought to New Testament theology. Questions of modern biblical interpretation related to Pauline literature are addressed.

Credits: 3

A study of the major texts and theological themes of Johannine literature. Attention is given to the historical setting and issues which gave rise to this literature, as well as critical issues and lines of interpretation raised by modern scholarship. According to the interest of the instructor, the course may emphasize the exegesis of selected texts or survey major theological themes.

Credits: 3

Biblical Studies Courses

A survey of important principles of biblical interpretation, featuring issues of special significance for Evangelicals and Pentecostals. Attention is given to help students develop skills to grasp the intent of the biblical author in the various genres.

Credits: 3

Scholars bring special expertise in a subject that enriches the usual offerings available.

Credits: 1-3

Communication Courses

A study of the preparation and delivery of sermons. Consideration is given to different forms of sermons with an emphasis on developing delivery skills.

Credits: 3

Discusses the theory of communication and deals with issues facing communicators in cross-cultural situations. A basic model of the communication process is examined.

Credits: 3

An in-depth biblical study of mentoring in the context of ministry and Christian living for the purpose of laying a foundation for relational empowerment and developing Christian character and leadership qualities in others. Examples from the Scriptures and the historical record are discussed. Vertical and horizontal mentoring relationships both passive and intense are studied.

Credits: 3

Brings together the history, theology, hermeneutics, homiletics and contextuality of preaching into a workable whole from a Pentecostal perspective. It includes both academic and practical components. (Prerequisite: MCC 510 or equivalent)

Credits: 3

Develops experience in preparing and preaching expository sermons. Consideration is given to the appropriate presentation and delivery of expository sermons. (Prerequisite: MCC 510 or equivalent)

Credits: 3

Students work under faculty supervision with either electronic or print media. Practical assignments are completed in radio, video, audio-slides, or in the production of literature, such as tracts or magazines.

Credits: 1-3

Scholars bring special expertise in a subject that enriches the usual offerings available.

Credits 1-3

Christian Education Courses

Examines the biblical, theological, philosophical, historical, and psychological foundational issues of Christian education. It explores the purpose of Christian education, ministry roles in Christian education, and various types of Christian education ministries. (Required: M. Div)

Credits: 3

A survey of psychological theories and principles and their application to Christian education. It includes a study of the changes in human behavior by which skills, knowledge, and attitudes are learned. The primary theories of cognitive, moral, and faith development are considered, along with how these ideas transfer across cultures. The course is intended to provide tools necessary to make the teaching/learning process more effective.

Credits: 3

A study of curriculum theory and development as applied to the Bible school and local church education programs. The student will review the teaching/learning process with emphasis on curriculum and lesson planning. Opportunity is given to plan and write curricular materials. (Recommended prerequisites: MCE 522 and MCE 523)

Credits: 3

An examination of the discipleship/Christian formation ministries of the local church. Emphasis is given to the various approaches used, including small groups, one-on-one discipleship, and independent resources. Development of an all church plan for spiritual and gift enrichment is considered.

Credits: 3

An examination of the teaching/learning process in the college context. Emphasis is on the development of quality teaching through preparation, presentation, and evaluation of lessons in the areas of biblical studies, theology, and Christian education. Significant attention is given to developing appropriate instructional methods and utilizing appropriate testing procedures.

Credits: 3

An introductory course covering the functions of a library. Equal emphasis is given to library science (the theoretical) and librarianship (the practical)

Credits: 3

An examination of the principles, skills and practices of Bible school administration. Emphasis is on both theoretical and practical components of this topic within the Asian context.

Credits 3

By special arrangement a student may teach a course in the area of Bible, theology, or Christian education for a Bible college. The teaching experience is supervised and evaluated by an assigned faculty member. (Prerequisite: MCE 541)

Credits:3

Designed to give practical Christian education experience in an area involving new skills and ministry expressions by the students. (Prerequisite: MCE 522)

Credits: 3

Designed to give the student experience in the administrative dimensions of theological education. There is close supervision and a report is expected at the end of the practicum. (Prerequisite: MCC 591)

Credits: 1-3

Designed to give hands-on experience in technical and readers’ services using the APTS library and its processes as the setting. Interaction between the lecturer, student, APTS library staff, and APTS patrons helps this learning process. (Prerequisite: MCE 550 or must have been a librarian for at least two years.)

Credits: 3

Scholars bring special expertise in subjects that enrich the usual offerings available.

Credits: 1-3

Church Ministries Courses

An introduction to the basic concepts and principles of an effective and scriptural ministry. The work of evangelists, pastors, teachers, missionaries, etc., is considered along with a biblical examination of the minister’s worldview, personal life philosophy, theology of the church, and philosophy of ministry. Specific topics include call, ministry models, ethical standards, and relationships. Students will be expected to develop a statement of their lifestyle philosophy and their theology of the church and ministry.

Credits: 3

Designed to help the student develop a biblical philosophy of pastoral ministry. Students are introduced to the basic concepts, principles, qualifications, responsibilities, relationships, and disciplines required for an effective pastoral ministry.

Credits: 3

Presents a biblical approach to Christian counseling that embraces the healing or therapeutic power of God’s love (agape), and seeks to put into practice biblical principles relating to personal wholeness and human relationships. Using biblical concepts and principles, the course provides a basis for evaluating secular therapies.

Credits: 3

A study of leadership principles, skills and tasks as they relate to leadership within Christian organizations.  Specific areas of consideration include Biblical examples of leadership, servant leadership, stages of leadership development, spiritual leadership, leadership theories and styles, and management strategies.

Credits: 3

Investigates the meaning of Christian marriage and home, and the structure and functions of the family as a unit. Attention is given to identifying problem areas common to Christian marriage and family life and how to work at preventing and solving these problems. (Prerequisites: MCH 523)

Credits: 3

Church organizational structures are investigated. Emphasis is placed on management planning, organizing, leading, controlling and evaluating of local church ministries.

Credits: 3

The nature, methods, and approaches of evangelism are studied in view of the biblical imperative and theological foundation for the outreach of the Church. Emphasis is given to the process of impacting the community both personally and through corporate ministry.

Credits 3

Provides a Biblical and practical framework for building and developing effective ministry to youth within the context of the local church. Primary attention is given to the equipping and mobilizing of church youth in the junior and senior high age bracket. Ministry to college-age and young professionals within the local church is also addressed.

Credits:3

The university ministry training program for potential and new campus ministers and missionaries. Students will receive instruction in theology, strategy, and implementation of the university ministry philosophy of prayer, worship, fellowship, discipleship and witness.

Credits: 3

Stresses the importance of understanding children and reaching them with the Gospel of Christ. It is designed to introduce the biblical picture of children, their physical, mental, emotional and social development, and how to effectively evangelize and disciple them.

Credits: 3

Emphasizes the practical aspects of church and community issues from a biblical perspective. Consideration is given to practical application of biblical principles to contemporary issues in relation to social concerns.

Credits: 3

Examines the principles and dynamics of church growth for implementation in the local church. Concepts and skills are developed that under gird the ministry of the local church and facilitate the task of evangelism.

Credits: 3

ministry course that deals with women’s issues from a biblical perspective. Social issues which impact women particularly will be viewed through the lenses of Scripture, history and culture to develop a biblically sound basis for ministry by women and to women.

Credits: 3

A study of issues faced in contemporary pastoral counseling, including divorce and remarriage, depression, burnout, grief, terminal illness, and family issues. (Prerequisite: MCH 523)

Credits: 3

An investigation of worship in the Christian congregation with a view to developing a theology and philosophy of worship. Emphasis is on worship in the Scriptures, in the history of the Church, and its practice and practical implications for today.

Credits: 3

The student is given the opportunity to develop: a biblical and psychological understanding of marriage and family; the ability to identify marriage and family problems and growth needs; and skills in applying biblical principles and counseling methods to help individuals, couples, and family units to experience renewal, healing, wholeness, and maturity. Special attention is given to the importance of the Scriptures and spiritual resources. (Prerequisite: MCH 523.)

Credits: 3

Designed to give advanced ministerial practical experience in the application of counseling principles and theory in a supervised setting. All students are admitted to the counseling practicum on an individual basis and are required to sign statements of ethical standards and confidentiality. (Maximum of 2 credits per term; total 6 credits. Prerequisite: MCH 523 or any master’s level course in counseling).

Credits: 1-3

Designed to give practical ministerial experience in an area involving new skills and ministry expressions by the student. There is close supervision and a report is expected at the end of the practicum. (Prerequisite: MCH 510 or concurrent enrollment)

Credits: 1-3

Scholars bring special expertise in a subject that enriches the usual offerings available.

Credits: 1-3

The course will first establish a Biblical understanding of possessions, stewardship, giving and fundraising. From this Biblical foundation, the course will move into an examination of management essentials for finances including the budgeting process. The course will conclude with the process of raising funding from sources outside the church.

Credits: 3

History

A survey of the significant mission enterprises of the Christian church. Attention is given to the causes for successes and failures of selected mission enterprises, with a view to developing an effective missions strategy for today.

Credits: 3

A study of the origins and development of the modern Pentecostal movement. Attention is given to influences that have shaped the movement, to the significant streams that have merged, and to the interactions with the Charismatic Movement. Relationship with the Evangelical spectrum of Christianity and the larger church world are also considered. (Prerequisite: THE 580)

Credits: 3

Introduces the history of the Christian church from post-apostolic period to the dawn of the Reformation era. The main emphasis is to acquaint students with major historical developments, key figures, movements and doctrines of that time.

Credits: 3

An integrated study of the advancing world Christian movement in the Middle East, Africa, Europe, and Asia from 1500 to the present. Key personalities, sub-movements, theological controversies, spirituality and important historical developments receive consideration.

Credits: 3

A survey of the development of the Christian churches in Asia and the Pacific from the initial missionary efforts to the present. Special attention is given to the missionary efforts of the Church of the East and to recent developments in the region.

Credits: 3

A survey of the background and development of modern theological thought from the Reformation to the present era, including significant issues in the twentieth century. Special attention is given to the thought of key persons in selected theological movements, especially those that have special implications for Pentecostals. (Fulfills Historical Theology requirement: M.A.Th.)

Credits: 3

A study of significant issues and themes in the Post-Apostolic period. This includes the Age of the Fathers (95 to 590 A.D.), and the development of theology in the medieval Roman Catholic church up through the Scholastic period (1050 – 1350) and the Eastern Orthodox church to the fall of Byzantium in 1453. (Fulfills Historical Theology requirement: M.A.Th.)

Credits: 3

An examination of the great themes of the reformers, particularly Martin Luther and John Calvin, and to the contributions and problems of the Radical Reformation. Attention is given, as well, to the issues related to the period of Protestant Scholasticism that followed. (Fulfills Historical Theology requirement: M.A. Theology)

Credits: 3

Missions Courses

An evaluation of the biblical, theological and historical issues involved in Christian missions. Attention is given to what constitutes an effective indigenous model for contemporary missionary ministry.

Credits: 3

Examines the basic concepts of cultural anthropology from a Christian mission perspective. It also deals with various anthropological concepts and how they are applied to Christian missions.

Credits: 3

A study of the various learning styles of people living in multicultural situations. It also deals with the role of Christian educators and their impact in cross- cultural teaching settings.

Credits: 3

Surveys issues relevant to Muslim evangelism. It emphasizes the importance of sensitivity in cross-cultural communication and of using various contextual methodologies.

Credits: 3

Examines the theology of Islam and compares it to its counterpart in Christian theology. It equips students to be effective witnesses of their faith in Islamic countries.

An exposition of the major arguments Muslims raise against the Christian faith. The issues examined provide the students with a biblical perspective to defend their faith.

Credits: 3

Enables students to understand some key components in the lives of Muslim women. It also helps Christian women in their interaction with and work among Muslim women.

Credits: 3

An overview of Islam, how it has gained worldwide appeal and the peoples of the Muslim world. The worldview and specific phenomena the missionary will encounter in field situations are also discussed including issues facing Muslims today.

Credits: 3

An overview of the religious beliefs of Buddhism. It prepares students to be equipped in their evangelism among people of this religious group.

Credits: 3

Discusses the history of Buddhist-Christian interactions. The strategies and practices used in these interactions will be examined. Techniques are adopted to be used in specific contexts.

Credits: 3

Seeks to define what animism is, and why Pentecostal distinctives provide the best theological response. Animism exists both as a separate religious system and as a religious system that underpins every other religious system. The focus is heavily theological and anthropological.

Credits: 3

A study of the biblical and theological foundations for missions. Attention is given to the theme of the kingdom of God as it relates to the missionary task.

Credits: 3

A survey of the significant mission enterprises of the Christian church. Attention is given to the causes and failures of selected mission enterprises, with a view towards developing an effective mission strategy for today.

Credits: 3

Students explore the phenomenon of Popular or Folk Islam, its roots, beliefs, practices and localized expressions, and power in the everyday life of Muslims. Develop an understanding of the worldview of Muslims, of the co-existence of Folk and official Islam, and of the types of encounter which will empower the student to respond to the felt needs. The impact of Hadith traditions, on Muslims today, is discussed.

Credits: 3

An objective study of theological issues relevant to the Asian culture. Theological concepts are considered along with ethical ramifications of being a Christian in a non-Christian culture.

Credits: 3

Discusses the theory of communication and deals with issues facing communicators in cross-cultural situations. A basic model of the communication process is examined.

Credits: 3

A study of the historical development of Pentecostal missions around the world. Evaluations and recommendations for both Asian and Western Pentecostal missions are developed.

Credits: 3

Designed to help the student formulate a personal philosophical and practical framework in his or her potential missionary career. It seeks to impart to the student skills necessary for missionary life.

Credits: 3

Deals with issues encountered in cultures and settings beyond one’s own. It focuses on the relationship between Christianity and local cultures and the dynamics of cross-cultural communication.

Credits: 3

Aims to identify the components of an effective indigenous model for contemporary missionary work. Various topics are discussed leading to a workable model for mission work.

Credits: 3

An evaluation of the components involved in Christian missions. Attention is given to what constitutes an effective indigenous model for contemporary missionary ministry. (Prerequisite MIS 510)

Credits: 3

A survey of the development of Christian churches in the Asia-Pacific Region from the initial missionary efforts to the present. Special attention is given to the missionary efforts of the Church of the East and to recent developments in the region.

Credits: 3

A study of the history and basic tenets of the major religions in Asia: Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Confucianism, Daoism, and Shintoism. The purpose of the course is to find effective ways of evangelizing people associated with these religions.

Credits: 3

An interdisciplinary course which introduces students to various aspects of the Igorot tribal society and Christian evangelism that has been done among them. It also examines the various evangelistic/mission approaches with the aim of coming up with a model that is culturally sensitive but truthful to the Christian message.

Credits: 3

Designed to give practical supervised experience, to students, in a cross-cultural missions setting. There is close supervision and a report is expected at the end of the practicum.

Credits: 3

A study of the significance of the supernatural manifestation of God’s power in missions. Signs and wonders are viewed from various perspectives with an analysis of the Third Wave phenomenon and contemporary models.

Credits: 3

An introduction to teacher training in English as a Second or Foreign Language. The emphases are on training teachers in current teaching methodologies and equipping them with skills necessary for effective teaching.

Credits: 3

Designed to give students practice in teaching English as a second or foreign language. There is close supervision and a report is expected at the end of the practicum.

Credits: 3

An examination of the relationship and tension between Christian theology and Asian culture. Various models of contextualization are examined in an attempt to develop an approach to theologizing that is both biblically faithful and culturally relevant.

Credits: 3

Scholars bring special expertise in a subject that enriches the usual offering available.

Credits: 3

New Testament Courses

A study of the authorship, dating, literary structures, and other background issues relating to the books of the New Testament. Attention will also be given to problem areas and matters of higher criticism such as the Synoptic Problem.

Credits: 3

A study of the New Testament text in the light of its historical, political, social, economic, and cultural milieu. It provides a historical framework for understanding the biblical message, taking into account both canonical and non-canonical, literary, and archaeological sources.

Credits: 3

A study of various traditions and emphases of the Holy Spirit by New Testament authors. While allowing various books to speak for themselves, a comprehensive picture of New Testament pneumatology is developed.

A study focusing on principles of interpretation relevant to this distinctive genre, critical issues associated with the synoptic problem, and the distinctive message of each gospel.

Credits: 3

The major theological and doctrinal themes of the New Testament are examined in light of their immediate historical and cultural contexts. A survey of the history, methodology, and presuppositions of the discipline is included.

Credits: 3

An exploration of Mark’s Gospel, utilizing insights from a variety of perspectives, together with intensive exegetical study of selected passages.

Credits: 3

An exegetical study of 1 Corinthians, this course explores the historical and cultural background of the correspondence. Special attention will also be given to theological and ethical issues and their applications to the contemporary Church.

Credits: 3

Consideration is given to the authorship and historical background of the book, drawing parallels and contrasts with Colossians, and emphasizing theological issues.

Credits: 3

An intensive exegetical study of selected passages giving attention to the historical setting. The central message of the book and its relation to Mathew’s church is also considered.

Credits: 3

This is an exegetical study of selected portions of the4 text. Special Attention is given to the following the Pauline argument, themes, and issues related to soteriology.

Credits: 3

An analysis of the structure and content of 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus, with special attention to matters pertaining to church leadership. Critical questions are considered, including Pauline authorship.

Credits: 3

This course conducts an exegetical study of selected portions of the Greek text of the Gospel according to John. Emphasis will be placed on careful analysis of the Greek text as one important step in understanding the theological message of the Fourth Gospel.

Credits: 3

This course conducts an exegetical study of the Greek text of the Johannine Epistles. Emphasis will be placed on careful analysis of the Greek text as one important step in understanding the theological message of 1-3 John. Attention will be given to grammatical and syntactical features of the text, as well as literary and rhetorical devices employed by the author. Critical questions of authorship and salient theological themes will also be addressed.

Credits: 3

An intensive exegetical study of the sustained rhetorical argument of Hebrews. Attention is specifically given to the historical setting and the central message of the epistle. The epistle’s association with the church of the diasporic Jews in the first century is assumed.

Credits: 3

A study of the Third Gospel with particular attention to Lukan Theology, Luke as historian, and Lukan Pneumatology. Emphasis is given to Luke’s distinctive message of Jesus’ person and work in salvation, Luke’s historical and universal perspective, Jesus’ concern for the marginalized, and Jesus’ call for discipleship and its implications for the Christian today.

Credits: 3

An exegetical study of the book of Acts with emphasis on major historical developments and theological themes contained in the text. It considers the composition, structure, and historical milieu of the book, and studies the person and work of the Holy Spirit who empowers God’s mission. This course seeks to deepen the student’s understanding of God’s mission as it takes place through the apostles and the early church. It includes application and assessment of the exegetical insights for the contemporary church.

Credits: 3

A study in the major theological themes in Luke/Acts. Special attention is given to Luke’s overall purpose, his Pentecostal perspective, and his unique contribution to New Testament theology.

Credits: 3

A study of the distinct contributions of Paul’s missionary, pastoral, and theological thought to New Testament theology. Questions of modern biblical interpretation related to Pauline literature are addressed.

Credits: 3

A study of the major texts and theological themes of Johannine literature. Attention is given to the historical setting and issues which gave rise to this literature, as well as critical issues and lines of interpretation raised by modern scholarship. According to the interest of the instructor, the course may emphasize the exegesis of selected texts or survey major theological themes.

Credits: 3

This study of Luke-Acts will pay special attention to Luke’s purpose, both for his two-volume work as a whole and for his presentation of the work of the Holy Spirit. Luke’s unique contribution to a holistic biblical theology of the Holy Spirit will be highlighted. Additionally, the significant role that Luke-Acts has played as a catalyst for the modern Pentecostal movement will be explained and affirmed.

Credits: 3

Scholars may bring special expertise in a subject that enriches the usual offerings available.

Credits: 3

This course is an introduction to the parables of Jesus, focusing on their meaning within the life-setting of Jesus and that of the gospel writers. The course will initially focus on the history of interpretation and appropriate methodology for interpreting and applying the parables to contemporary life situations. The bulk of the course, however, will consist of an examination and analysis of 16 selected parables. Synoptic parallels will be studied with a view to uncovering how the evangelists interpreted the parables.

Credits: 3

Old Testament Courses

An introduction to the critical study of the Old Testament. History of interpretation and developments in manuscript evidence will be considered, along with a study of the major books.

Credits: 3

A study of the Old Testament world with its history, religion, culture, and literature. Developments in historiography and the integration of archaeological discoveries are considered.

Credits: 3

Students will analyze the accounts of Israel’s story as recorded in the books of Joshua, Judges, Samuel and Kings, and an evaluation of various attempts to harmonize that story with other historical evidence. Literary, textual and theological issues, as well as an examination of archaeological evidence, social institutions, and ideology, will provide the data for discussing the ideas contained in the Former Prophets and their role as scripture for the Church.

Credits: 3

Traces the development of the concept of the Spirit of God throughout the Old Testament. It also includes the investigation of the ancient Near Easternmaterial pertinent to the OT concept of the Spirit of God.

Credits: 3

Studies the theology of the Wisdom Literature with emphasis on the themes of creation, suffering, birth and death, retribution and immortality as found in the books of Proverbs, Job, Ecclesiastes, Song of Songs and selected “Wisdom” Psalms.

Credits: 3

A survey of the prophetic movement of ancient Israel in the context of its social, political, cultural and religious environment. Its origin, development, tradition, role and significance to the society and its religion is investigated.

Credits: 3

A study of the central biblical-theological themes in the Old Testament. This study includes reflections on the history and methodologies of Old Testament Theology along with specific theological trajectories.

Credits: 3

An exegetical study of the book of Esther in the Hebrew text. The primary approach is narratological, however, there is also an emphasis on historical-grammatical analysis. The student’s knowledge of Hebrew grammar, syntax and vocabulary is fully exploited in this course.

Credits: 3

An exegetical study of the book of Ruth in the Hebrew Text. The primary approach will be narratological, however, there will also be an emphasis on the historical-grammatical analysis. The student’s knowledge of Hebrew grammar, syntax and vocabulary is fully exploited in this course.

Credits: 3

An exegetical study of the book of Jonah in the Hebrew Text. The primary approach will be narratological, however, there will also be an emphasis on the historic-grammatical analysis. The student’s knowledge of Hebrew grammar, syntax and vocabulary is fully exploited in this course.

Credits: 3

Pentecostal Studies Courses

Traces the development of the concept of the Spirit of God throughout the Old Testament. It also includes the investigation of the ancient Near Eastern material pertinent to the OT concept of the Spirit of God.

Credits: 3

A study of various traditions and emphases of the Holy Spirit by New Testament authors. While allowing various books to speak for themselves, a comprehensive picture of New Testament pneumatology is developed.

Credits: 3

Examines some of the current issues in pneumatology generated by the charismatic renewal, such as Spirit-baptism, prophecy, tongues, , etc. It seeks to respond biblically and theologically to the various pneumatological beliefs and practices in the contemporary church. It equips students to evaluate critically both the positive contributions and the potential shortcomings of Pentecostal-Charismatic spirituality. The study is undertaken within the larger context of the Bible, church history and some major contemporary discussions of pneumatology by non-Charismatics.

Credits: 3

A study of various topics in Pentecostal studies. This includes origins, background, development and contemporary issues, and biblical foundations of Pentecostal theology.

Credits: 3

A study is made of the origins and development of the modern Pentecostal movement. Attention is given to influences that have shaped the movement, to the significant streams that have emerged, and to the interactions with the Charismatic Movement. Relationships with the Evangelical spectrum of Christianity and the larger church world are also considered. (Prerequisite: THE 580)

Credits: 3

A study of the origins, background, development, and contemporary issues in Pentecostal theology. The contemporary theological, hermeneutical, historiographical, missiological, and philosophical issues are considered.

Credits: 3

A study of the historical development of Pentecostal missions around the world. Evaluations and recommendations for both Asian and Western Pentecostal missions are developed.

Credits: 3

Examines theological, contextual and practical issues that Asian Pentecostal churches and believers are facing or will face in the near future. Considering the complex nature of the Asian context, and the formative and evolving nature of Pentecostal scholarship in Asia, various contemporary questions are raised with the hope that this reflection would contribute to the formation of healthy Asian Pentecostalism in the future.

Credits: 3

A study of the person and ministry of the Holy Spirit in and through the life of the believer and the church. The biblical foundation, historical development and various contemporary perspectives are emphasized.

Credits: 3

A study of Paul’s perspective on the Holy Spirit. A study of the distinct contributions of Paul’s missionary, pastoral, and theological thought on the Holy Spirit will be explored.

Credits: 3

Explores the doctrine of the Holy Spirit in contemporary thought. Pneumatologies from various schools of thought are considered, especially in contrast to contemporary Pentecostal perspectives.

Credits: 3

Scholars may bring special expertise in a subject that enriches the usual offerings available. A subject labeled in the 500’s will be a foundational subject. One labeled in the 600’s will be more advanced or more specific.

Credits: 1-3

Philosophy & Religion Courses

Examines elements of philosophy and philosophical thought for the purpose of comprehending the foundation of theological systems. Plato, Aristotle, and various other philosophers’ systems are analyzed in order to better understand theological schemes.

Credits: 3

Designed to equip the student to defend the Christian faith against important contemporary assaults and to build a positive Christian world-and-life view. Various issues and points of contention are noted.

Credits: 3

Discusses the history of Christian ethics as a backdrop to discussions concerning the foundation of ethics, and its ethical and meta-ethical considerations. The three main ethical systems—teleological, deontological and character ethics are explored. Consideration is given to the process of appropriate ethical decision making within the Christian community.

Credits: 3

A study of the history and basic tenets of the major religions in Asia: Buddhism, Hinduism, Islam, Confucianism, Daoism, and Shintoism. The purpose of the course is to find effective ways of evangelizing people associated with these religions.

Credits: 3

Scholars bring special expertise in a subject that enriches the usual offerings available.

Credits: 3

Research Courses

An introduction to the process of scholarly inquiry that includes a study of research methodology and the preparation and presentation of research papers and projects. Major research approaches are considered, including historical, descriptive, and experimental. Skills in library use are developed including bibliographic resources for biblical, theological, and educational topics.

Credits: 3

A continuation of Research Methods I with special emphasis on empirical research and statistical analysis of data. A thesis proposal is developed. (Required for students doing a thesis or field research project.)

Credits: 3

A continuation of Research Methods I with special emphasis on non-empirical research and proper research methodologies. A thesis proposal is developed. (Required for students doing a thesis or field research project.)

Credits: 3

Involves the completion of an extensive literature review, execution of an approved study with continuous evaluation throughout the project, and the writing of a research paper at the conclusion. This may be taken in conjunction with the student’s major concentration. (Prerequisites: approval of faculty committee, GPA of 3.3 or above based on 12 APTS credits, RES 536 and RES 537.)

Credits: 3

Open to those in the ministerial studies division in the subject areas of Christian education, communications, ministries, and missions. It involves the completion of an extensive literature review, execution of an approved study with continuous evaluation throughout the project, and the writing of a descriptive field research paper at the conclusion. This may be taken in conjunction with the student’s major concentration. (Prerequisites: approval of faculty committee, GPA of 3.3 or above based on 12 APTS credits, RES 536 and RES 537)

Credits: 3

Research in an individually defined area wherein the student identifies a significant research subject that he/she purposes to explore and does the research under supervision. Progress in the research is indicated by research reports as outlined by the director of the research project. (This is available to students who have completed at least 18 credits of graduate study with a GPA of 3.3 or above, upon approval of the Academic Dean.)

Credits: 1-3

Field Education is an intensive field-based internship requiring 10-12 weeks of full time involvement (min. 400 hours for 6 credits, 200 hours for 3 credits). This may be completed during the summer or the academic year. Obtain Field Education Guidelines for details.

Credits: 3-6

Theology Courses

Examines elements of philosophy and philosophical thought for the purpose of comprehending the foundation of theological systems. Plato, Aristotle, and various other philosophers’ systems are analyzed in order to better understand theological schemes.

Credits: 3

An introduction to theology and its methodology. Emphasis is given to theology proper, bibliology, anthropology, angelology, and pneumatology.

Credits: 3

A study of selected key topics in theology. The focus is on christology, soteriology, hamartiology, ecclesiology, and tology

Credits: 3

Examines some of the current issues in pneumatology generated by the charismatic renewal, such as Spirit-baptism, prophecy, tongues, healing, etc. It seeks to respond biblically and theologically to the various pneumatological beliefs and practices in the contemporary church. It equips students to evaluate critically both the positive contributions and the potential shortcomings of Pentecostal-Charismatic spirituality. The study is undertaken within the larger context of the Bible, church history and some major contemporary discussions of pneumatology by non-Charismatics.

Credits: 3

A study of the biblical and theological foundations for missions. Attention is given to the theme of the kingdom of God as it relates to the missionary task.

Credits: 3

An objective study of theological issues relevant to the Asian context. Theological concepts are considered along with ethical ramifications of being a Christian in a non-Christian culture.

Credits: 3

A study of various topics in Pentecostal studies. It includes origins, background, development and contemporary issues, and biblical foundations of Pentecostal theology.

Credits: 3

This course features the Torah concept of the Hebrew Bible, its development through the Torah, Prophets, and Writings, and its presentation in Late Antiquity. Detailed attention will be given to the latest methodological approaches and the importance of cognitive studies for Christian mission today. The role of spiritual experience in the Torah concept formation and the presentation of Jesus as a new Torah will be discussed. The prayerful study carried out by each participant will be shared in seminar fashion during the course sessions, as we gather around the holy Word seeking the guidance of the Holy Spirit.

Credits: 3

A study of divine healing that explores its historical development, biblical foundation, and various contextual and contemporary issues.

Credits: 3

A study of the origins, background, development, and contemporary issues in Pentecostal theology. The contemporary theological, hermeneutical, historiographical, missiological, and philosophical issues are considered.

Credits: 3

Examines theological, contextual and practical issues that Asian Pentecostal churches and believers are facing or will face in the near future. Considering the complex nature of the Asian context, and the formative and evolving nature of Pentecostal scholarship in Asia, various contemporary questions are raised with the hope that this reflection would contribute to the formation of healthy Asian Pentecostalism in the future.

Credits: 3

Discusses the history of Christian ethics as a backdrop to discussions concerning the foundation of ethics, and its ethical and meta-ethical considerations. The three main ethical systems-teleological, deontological and character ethics are explored. Consideration is given to the process of appropriate ethical decision making within the Christian community.

Credits: 3

A survey of the background and development of modern theological thought from the Reformation to the present era, including significant issues in the twentieth century. Special attention is given to the thought of key persons in selected theological movements, especially those that have special implications for Pentecostals.
(Fulfills Historical Theology requirement: M.A.Th.)

Credits: 3

A study of the distinct contributions of Paul’s missionary, pastoral, and theological thought to New Testament theology. Questions of modern biblical interpretation related to Pauline literature are addressed.

Credits: 3

A study of the major texts and theological themes of Johannine literature. Attention is given to the historical setting and issues which gave rise to this literature, as well as critical issues and lines of interpretation raised by modern scholarship. According to the interest of the instructor, the course may emphasize the exegesis of selected texts or survey major theological themes.

Credits: 3

A study of the person and ministry of the Holy Spirit in and through the life of the believer and the church. The biblical foundation, historical development, and various contemporary perspectives are emphasized. (Prerequisites: THE 530 and 531)

Credits: 3

Explores the doctrine of the Holy Spirit in contemporary thought. Pneumatologies from various schools of thought are considered, especially in contrast to contemporary Pentecostal perspectives.

Credits: 3

A survey of Biblical principles from both the Old and New Testaments relating to possessions and wealth. Christian theologies of possessions and wealth from the early church onward will also be surveyed. Special attention will be given to various prosperity theologies popular among Pentecostals. Application of Biblical principles of possessions and wealth to matters of stewardship, poverty alleviation and political economy will also be addressed.

Credits: 3

This course is to examine why and how the fatherhood of God is so much emphasized in biblical literature. An intensive study of selected passages by way of narrative criticism pays attention to the meanings of the Father. A central message of each book and its relation to our theme or theology is also considered.

Credits: 3

A study of significant issues and themes in the Post-Apostolic period. This includes the Age of the Fathers (95 to 590 A.D.), and the development of theology in the medieval Roman Catholic church up through the Scholastic period (1050 – 1350) and the Eastern Orthodox church to the fall of Byzantium in 1453. (Fulfills Historical Theology requirement: M.A.Th.)

Credits: 3

An examination of the great themes of the reformers, particulary Martin Luther and John Calvin, and to the contributions and problems of the Radical Reformation. Attention is given, as well, to the issues related to the period of Protestant Scholasticism that followed. (Fulfills Historical Theology requirement: M.A.Th.)

Credits: 3

An examination of the relationship and tension between Christian theology and Asian culture. Various models of contextualization are examined in an attempt to develop an approach to theologizing that is both biblically faithful and culturally relevant.

Credits: 3

A study in the major theological themes in Luke/Acts. Special attention is given to Luke’s overall purpose, his Pentecostal perspective, and his unique contribution to New Testament theology

Credits: 3

Doctor of Ministry Courses

An eclectic course, examining biblical (especially Paul, Mark, Luke, and John), missiological, theological and pastoral insights to the gifts of the Spirit. It presents the biblical and theological basis for ministry empowered by spiritual gifts and an understanding of the church and her major functions from a theological and structural point of view.

Credits: 3

The course will first establish a Biblical understanding of possessions and wealth creation, stewardship, asking for money. From this Biblical foundation, the course will move into an examination of stewardship both from the personal and ministry perspectives. The course will conclude with the process of raising funding from sources outside the church and recruiting stewards to participate in the Great Commission.

Credits: 3

This course in advanced Christian Ethics examines and interacts with various ethical issues and topics as they relate to Leadership and Ministry practice. Its particular focus is on the application of ethics, including how ethical approaches influence practical outcomes. In order to achieve this, some of the essential ethical theory, ethical perspectives, and foundational writings underpinning ethical practice will also be examined. Ultimately, ethical practice is only as good as the moral theory and ethical philosophy driving it. Such theory and philosophy lay down the standard and criteria for approaching any practical ethical issue or topic. This course adopts a Christian worldview, though it will illustrate how different theories and perspectives can easily lead to different ethical conclusions. Following this underpinning, the background is then set for a close examination of many of the current day influential ethical issues faced by the Christian leaders and ministers such as wealth and poverty, human sexuality, the beginnings and ending of life, class relationships, stewardship of Creation, and law and government. In essence, the course is predominantly seminar based in which students engage, discuss and interact with ethical theory and practice in dissecting and coming to conclusion on various practical modern-day ethical issues relevant to leadership and ministry practice.

Credits: 3

Examines various issues that have arisen out of theological foundations and ministerial aspects of the Pentecostal/Charismatic movement in Asia. Some foci of discussions include biblical, theological, historical and contextual components which have contributed to the contemporary shape of the Asian Pentecostal/Charismatic movement. The ministerial discussions deal with various issues confronting Pentecostal/Charismatic churches today. Inevitably the latter discussion often looks into the theological root(s) of the issues and explores theologically sound, contextually relevant and magisterially edifying ways to strengthen various ministries. Considering the complex nature of the Asian context, and the formative and evolving nature of Pentecostal scholarship in Asia, various contemporary questions are raised with the hope that this reflection might contribute to the formation of healthy Asian Pentecostalism in the future.

Credits: 3

A study of the significance of the supernatural manifestation of God’s power in ministry. Signs and wonders are viewed from various perspectives with an analysis of the Third Wave Phenomenon and contemporary models.

Credits: 3

Animism exists both as a separate religious system and as a religious system that undermines every other religious system. This course seeks to define what animism is, and why Pentecostal distinctive provides the best biblical response. The course is heavily theological and anthropological.

Credits: 3

Both academic and practical, it seeks to bring together everything Pentecostals believe about preaching into a cohesive unit. The History, Theology, and Hermeneutics of Pentecostal Preaching are studied. Different types of sermons, conducting a healing and deliverance service, outline and delivery of a sermon, and culture and preaching are all included.

Credits: 3

Focuses on the care of congregants by the pastoral caregiver. It explores-in-depth: The spiritual and educational preparation and calling of the caregiver; the people who are troubled, wounded, worried, grieved, depressed, anxious, etc., and the role of the shepherd in alleviating their distress while facilitating healing and restoring well-being; and promotion of growth in the parishioner’s feelings, thinking, human relationships and behavioral patterns. This course is bibliotherapeutic, holistic, and strictly Christian.

Credits: 3

Intended to provide an overview of leadership in the 21st Century in the Asian context. Conflict resolution in Christian organizations with an emphasis on the cross-cultural basis of conflict is discussed. The need for change in the fast-paced world in which we live as well as colliding cultures are examined. The emergence of the missional church and the part it plays in the post-modern world are analyzed.

Credits: 3

Focuses on different models of Urban ministry, and reflects on their effectiveness and transplantability.

Credits: 3

Emphasizes the practical aspects of church and community issues from a biblical perspective. Consideration is given to the practical application of biblical principles to contemporary issues in relation to social concerns. Developing a plan for leading a church, or a group of churches into Holistic ministry is an integral part of the course.

Credits: 3

An examination of education and discipleship ministries in the local church. Emphasis is given to the various approaches used, including small groups, one-on-one discipleship, and independent resources. Development of an all-church plan for spiritual and gift enrichment is considered. Consideration is also given to developing a plan for a group of churches, or for use in Bible School settings.

Credits: 3

An examination of the nature and function of conflict in religious organizations. Theological reflection and spirituality are integrated with social-scientific theories in order for church leaders to be intentional and effective in their intervention strategies and management of conflict. Actual conflict situations, case studies, and resources of the Christian faith are utilized.

Credits: 3

This is an advanced course in creative communication with emphasis placed on the use of developing technology including the computer, presentation software (PowerPoint/Key-note/MediaShout/PresenterPro/EasyWorship, etc.), digital audio, digital imaging, digital video, and the internet (especially use of social media). Special attention is paid to the congregational context, the classroom and other training settings, as well as issues of secure communication (as appropriate for the group). For the greatest benefit, participants should be reasonably proficient in computer use and have a computer available for use in the class. The course will have a strong hands-on component and is geared towards gaining skills and proficiency.

Credits: 3

An examination of the teaching/learning process in the college context, especially for a Bible school context. Emphasis is on the development of quality teaching through preparation, presentation, and evaluation of lessons in the areas of biblical studies, theology, ministry, and Christian education. Significant attention is given to diverse methodologies, writing of syllabi, developing appropriate instructional material and utilizing appropriate testing procedures.

Credits: 3

A critical examination of current missiological trends and issues within global missions (including both evangelical and Pentecostal missions). Such issues and trends as the “indigenous church” principle, contextualization/syncretism, networking/collaboration, religious pluralism, poverty, human trafficking/children at risk, persecution, immigration, political
structures, spiritual encounters, health and wealth issues, etc. Discussions also include new opportunities and challenges for Asian Pentecostal/Charismatic Christianity in fulfilling the missionary mandate of the Church.

Credits: 3

Introduces the student to the process of scholarly inquiry in theology and ministry-related areas, including research methodology and the preparation and presentation of academic research papers and projects. Major research approaches are examined. Special emphasis is given to the developments of skills in using the library and its resources, and research writing. The course includes the development of a model research paper.

Credits: 3

Involves completion of an extensive literature review, execution of an
approved study with continuous evaluation by a supervisor throughout the project, and the writing of a research paper at the conclusion. It is a required element for the Doctor of Ministry program.

Credits: 3

Doctor of Philosophy Courses

The comprehensive exam is an exercise for the student to demonstrate their ability to handle substantive issues, various research questions, and empirical knowledge in a specific area of the student’s interest. The exam will take into consideration the background and knowledge of the body of material that will be used for the student’s dissertation.

Credits: 9

This course is designed to support postgraduate students in developing their research project and to assist them in defining their mode of inquiry. The course has been constructed to guide students through a range of issues and considerations, which should inform their general approach to research. It will give students a general introduction to postgraduate research, its methodologies, its challenges and its organization, including in creative practice. Students will be introduced to a range of research tools and will be equipped to plan and organize their research, as well as to communicate their findings.

Credits: 3

An objective study of theological issues relevant to the Asia/Pacific context. Theological concepts are considered along with ethical ramifications of  being a Christian in a non-Christian culture. Also, the study will look at what is
distinctively Asian that will assist in discovering and knowing the Christian community, theologies, and education within the Asia/Pacific region.

Credits: 3

A specific study according to the student’s proposal. The student will demonstrate his/her ability in the areas of methodology, literature review, analysis of the data and the interpretation and application of the data. From these various areas, the student will demonstrate their ability to use various research tools to articulate the findings. At the end of the writing, the student will submit the dissertation to the Post Graduate Committee for final approval. Following the approval, the research exercise is capped with an oral defense of the student’s specific area of study.

Credits: 3